Ghost of the Long Ago Drawer (2014) short film review

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An older woman, troubled by a past event that changed her life forever, revisits the scene of the crime in the short film Ghosts of the Long Ago Drawer. Read our review right here.

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Written and Directed by Al Germani, Ghosts of the Long Ago Drawer is a ten-minute head trip revolving around a woman’s tragedy. Angie (played by Joan Westmoreland) is sat on a sofa with a coffee table in front of her. She opens the table’s drawer and takes out a collection of rather worrying and disturbing memorabilia from her past; needles, vodka, chocolate and photographs.

It soon becomes apparent that Angie hides a past. One where she behaved with reckless abandonment, hooked on drugs and alcohol. This in turn led to a tragic event that many a person would find it hard to bounce back from.

Ghosts of the Long Ago Drawer poster 835x1024 Ghost of the Long Ago Drawer (2014) short film reviewJoan Westmoreland puts in powerful performance as Angie. She let’s all the emotions that the character is feeling pour out of her, and it’s an impressive display. Just with her sat in front of the table, looking through the items of her past was great, but I loved the scene where she is sat with her on-screen husband in a restaurant when she declares that she is tired and wants to leave. Once again, it was powerful.

This takes me to the screenplay by Al Germani. Al mostly uses vivid images to tell the story, but he does throw some scenes with dialogue in along the way and when he does, he does it well. What impressed me the most about Ghosts of the Long Ago Drawer though, was the editing. It was slick, vivid and nightmarish-like (in a good way). As Angie travelled down the rabbit hole, we the viewer went down with her – both bombarded with strange imagery and fast cuts. I though the editing was so good, I made sure to sit through all the credits to find the editor’s name in order to mention him/her in this review, only to find that the edit was also done by Al Germani. A talented guy indeed.

In order to make this review fair, I did have one gripe. In some instances, the cinematography looked fantastic – especially the opening shot of Angie and a match. Yet it became a little uneven, and some shots let the other work down. Also, the short may not be for everyone. It is a little “artsy” and that may put some people off, yet others will lap it up.

Overall, I enjoyed Ghosts of the Long Ago Drawer and will certainly be looking out for future work by Al Germani.

4 / 5 stars     

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